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New Speeding Camera At Work On Maryland Highway

Some in the state of Maryland worry that “Big Brother” is among resident drivers now that cameras are replacing officers at certain traffic areas. According to reports, the newest Maryland speeding camera has been put in a construction area on the Baltimore Washington Parkway.

The addition is reportedly the result of various avoidable fatal car accidents that have taken place in area construction zones. By introducing a speeding camera to the work zone, county officials hope that drivers will feel as though they will be held accountable for their driving, even when an officer isn’t present.

Where the new camera is located, the posted speed limit is 55 mph. When a driver, whether from in state or out of state, is caught by the camera going at least 12 miles over the speed limit, he or she will receive a citation in the mail. At this point and until the beginning of 2011, only warnings will be mailed out to offending drivers. But after that, each offense will cost $40.

Since the introduction of several speeding cameras throughout the state about a year ago, more than $9 million worth of citation fines have been paid by drivers. The money reportedly goes toward state law enforcement. It’s important to note that unlike in the instance of other Maryland traffic violations, insurance rates reportedly won’t be affected by speeding camera citations.

Critics of the cameras don’t think that road safety is more important than the right to privacy. They suspect that the cameras are at least about making the state money as they are about driver and worker safety. What do you think about traffic cameras? Are they smart police work, or do they violate citizens’ rights to privacy?

Source

HometownAnnapolis.com: “First speed camera in county launched,” Ben Weathers, 13 Dec. 2010

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