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TODD K. MOHINK, PA Glen Burnie & Columbia Family & Criminal Lawyer

When is the Right Time to Get Married?

YoungCouple

In the past, people married in their late teens and early 20s and they stayed married for the rest of their lives—sometimes 50 or 60 years. Many people today yearn to have the loving marriage that their grandparents or parents did, but that does not always happen.

People get divorced for various reasons. Many marriages end due to infidelity. Some end due to abuse or dishonesty. Some people are just bored with their marriage and want something new and exciting.

In a recent study, 40% of couples claimed they divorced due to financial reasons and because they married too young. So what exactly is the best age to tie the knot? Do some research and you’ll get different answers. According to a mathematical theory, the perfect age to get married is 26. A marriage and family therapist says to wait a few more years and get hitched between the ages of 28 and 32.

Experts say you don’t want to get married too young—say, 20 years old—but you don’t want to wait until you’re 40 years old to walk down the aisle, either. When a person gets older, they get set in their ways. Marriage is harder when you’re inflexible. You have to take into account the other person’s wants and needs, and that can be hard when you’re in your 40s and you’ve spent your whole life taking care of your needs only. Also, research shows that couples who get married when they reach their mid-30s and beyond are actually more likely to divorce than those who get married when they are in their late 20s. Therefore, once you reach 30, there really is no advantage to waiting any longer. This applies to people of all demographics, regardless of gender, race, religion, family structure and sexual history.

There is another issue at play when people wait to get married. They face a smaller pool of potential spouses. Most people are married or have been married by that time, so they are dealing with prospects who are in the same boat as them. Their marriage is not as likely to succeed because they do not have the flexibility to make things work.

But at the same time, getting married too young is also problematic. It’s important that people discover themselves and enjoy the single life before getting married. Plus, it is important that their brain stops growing and they reach a certain level of maturity. This often does not happen until a person is at least 25 years old.

Contact a Maryland Divorce Lawyer Today

Age can factor into a divorce. Some people mature at faster rates, while some people are immature until they reach their 40s. If you don’t get married at the right time, you risk divorce.

There are many reasons why couples divorce. No matter your situation, the Columbia divorce lawyers at the Law Offices of Todd K. Mohink, P.A. can help you achieve a less stressful divorce and more favorable outcome. To schedule a free consultation, fill out the online form or call (410) 774-5987. We have two offices to serve you.

Resources:

businessinsider.com/best-age-to-get-married-is-26-2017-2

news.yahoo.com/most-common-reasons-divorce-according-184300311.html

seattlebridemag.com/expert-wedding-advice/what-right-age-get-married

https://www.marylandlawhelp.com/working-from-home-with-your-spouse-without-conflict/

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