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TODD K. MOHINK, PA Glen Burnie & Columbia Family & Criminal Lawyer

What is Aggravated DUI in Maryland?

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DUIs are common in Maryland and other states. Driving while intoxicated can lead to serious injuries and even death. Impaired driving caused 10% of all crashes between 2011 and 2015.

While DUIs often come with significant penalties, they are often charged as misdemeanors. There are cases, however, where they can be charged as felonies. A person can be charged with aggravated DUI in Maryland if they drove while under the influence of drugs or alcohol and acted in an especially reckless manner. This is above and beyond a typical DUI.

A DUI is a crime that can affect your life in many ways. You will lose your license and face significant fines. If you are allowed to drive, you may have to install an ignition interlock device in your vehicle. Your insurance rates will likely double or even triple. You may even face jail time.

An aggravated DUI comes with even more serious penalties. Read on to learn about the factors involved and the penalties you could possibly face.

What is Considered an Aggravated DUI? 

You could face aggravated DUI charges if any of the following apply:

  • You are intoxicated and cause an accident that leads to serious injury or death.
  • Your blood alcohol concentration is 0.15 or above
  • You are driving under the influence while a minor is in the vehicle
  • You were speeding while intoxicated.
  • You have had multiple DUI convictions in the past decade.

Depending on the circumstances, a DUI can be elevated to a felony. This is especially true in cases where a DUI leads to fatality, since the charge of vehicular manslaughter applies.

Possible Penalties for Aggravated DUI 

The penalties for an aggravated DUI will depend on the circumstances. A person who is intoxicated and causes an injury can face three years in jail and $5,000 in fines. A DUI accident that results in fatality can result in five years in jail.

There can also be enhanced penalties in terms of increased fines and ignition interlock devices for extended periods of time. The court may also opt to suspend a person’s driver’s license for a longer period of time.

A person who is intoxicated and drives with a minor in the vehicle can not only face aggravated DUI charges but also child endangerment charges. A person who speeds or drives in a reckless manner while intoxicated can face reckless driving charges.

The stakes are high for those accused of aggravated DUI. Do not simply ignore this charge. Seek legal help right away to defend yourself and preserve your legal rights. 

Contact a Maryland Criminal Defense Lawyer Today 

The typical DUI comes with significant penalties. An aggravated DUI further enhances these penalties, causing a person to pay hefty fines, spend months in jail and lose their license for a long period of time.

Don’t face an aggravated DUI charge in your own. Seek help from the Glen Burnie DUI and traffic offense lawyers at the Law Offices of Todd K. Mohink, P.A. We can assess your case and provide you with the strongest defense possible. We can help you move forward with your life. To schedule a consultation, call (410) 774-5987 or fill out the online form. We have two offices in Maryland to serve you.

https://www.marylandlawhelp.com/should-i-plead-guilty-to-a-first-dui/

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