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TODD K. MOHINK, PA Glen Burnie & Columbia Family & Criminal Lawyer

Maryland Man Sentenced To Prison For Identity Theft, Mail Theft

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Theft and fraud are illegal, but many people engage in these crimes anyway because a good scheme can net them a lot of money. Many people have stolen hundreds of thousands and even millions of dollars from unsuspecting victims. However, they are eventually caught and prosecuted for their crimes.

A Maryland man is facing eight years in federal prison and three years of supervised release for various fraud crimes. The 30-year-old man from Baltimore was sentenced on March 30 after he was convicted of aggravated identity theft as well as stealing mail containing  Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act benefits. In addition to his prison sentence, the man must also pay restitution in the amount of $29,234, which is the total amount of his victims’ losses.

The man engaged in various fraud schemes between October 2019 and June 2020. On October 11, 2019, he fraudulently submitted a financing application to purchase a 2016 Maserati Ghibli.  He used a fake Social Security number for as well as false employment and income information. He was able to secure $30,227 in financing to purchase the vehicle.

In February and March 2020, the man also defrauded banks and stole checks from the mail.  Police used a GPS tracking device installed in a stolen parcel to track the man’s movements. Officers located a vehicle in Pikesville, Maryland, with 358 pieces of unprocessed mail. The man was arrested and later released from custody. Approximately 136 postal customers had their mail stolen, with 48 victims reporting stolen checks totaling $48,938.

Police executed a search warrant on the man’s electronic devices. His cell phones contained text messages about fake credit profiles and identification documents and fraudulent bank transactions. There were also lists of personal information relating to at least 1,100 credit cards.

Once the man was released from custody in March 2020, he continued to engage in fraud. He submitted a false claim for unemployment benefits in Florida. He used the name of a real person but used a false mailing address in Baltimore. The man received $875 in checks to the Baltimore address. Around May 1, 2020, the man also fraudulently received an Economic Impact Payment (EIP) check under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. The $2,900 check was intended for a married couple in Maryland.

On June 23, 2020, however, the man deposited the check into a bank account that he fraudulently opened. The following day, police executed a search warrant and seized various items.

Contact a Maryland Criminal Defense Attorney Today

Identity theft and mail theft are on the rise because people are looking for one thing: money. Stealing can help people get money, but this type of scheme is illegal.

If you have been arrested for identity theft, contact the Columbia white collar crime lawyers at The Law Offices of Todd K. Mohink, P.A. We can assess your case and reduce your punishment. Let us help you clear your name. Call (410) 774-5987 or fill out the online form to schedule a consultation. We have two offices to serve you.

Resource:

justice.gov/usao-md/pr/serial-fraudster-sentenced-8-years-federal-prison-conspiring-steal-mail-stealing-benefits

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