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TODD K. MOHINK, PA Glen Burnie & Columbia Family & Criminal Lawyer

2 Maryland Men Arrested for Carjacking

CarDoor

Nobody likes having their possessions stolen. This is especially true when it comes to vehicles. We depend on our cars and trucks to transport us from place to place. Plus, a vehicle is often the second most expensive purchase a person will make in their lives, so seeing something that they worked hard to buy get stolen can be devastating.

As such, car theft and carjacking cases are often taken seriously. Two men in Maryland have been arrested by Anne Arundel County police for carjacking a vehicle in early May.

The incident happened on the morning of May 3 at an Exxon gas station on Laurel Fort Meade Road. Two men approached the victim at the Laurel gas station. One of the men showed the victim a handgun and told him not to go back into his car. The two men got into the Ford Escape and took off.

The two men were later arrested. The suspects, ages 27 and 40, have been charged with armed carjacking. They are also facing theft charges for two shoplifting incidents in Glen Burnie and Hanover. The 27-year-old man also faces charges of felony theft, unlawful stealing of a motor vehicle, conspiracy to commit armed robbery and carjacking, and  assault. He is in jail without bond.

What is Carjacking?

Carjacking is not the same as grand theft auto. Grand theft auto involves stealing an unoccupied vehicle without force. Carjacking, on the other hand, involves violently stealing an occupied vehicle. It typically encompasses these three elements:

  1. The person intended to cause serious injury or death.
  2. The person took the motor vehicle in the presence of the owner or another person.
  3. The person took the vehicle by intimidation, force or violence.

Carjackers use fear to get compliance from victims. Because carjackers are typically armed, many people would rather give up their car (albeit reluctantly) than die. However, some people will fight for their vehicle and many unfortunately die.

Carjackings often happen in four main ways. In many cases, a  person will rear-end the victim’s vehicle. When the victim exits the vehicle to assess the damage, the carjacker will then take the car. Sometimes the carjacker will stage a fake car accident to get a passerby to pull over and help. Then, when someone stops to assist, the carjacker will steal their vehicle. Some carjackers will even follow a victim home and block their access to a gate or driveway. Many carjacking incidents happen at gas stations, where victims will exit their vehicle for a few minutes.

Contact a Maryland Criminal Defense Today

Stealing someone’s car, especially with armed force such as a handgun, is a serious crime. Depending on the value of the vehicle, a person can up to 20 years in prison and $25,000 in fines.

If you are accused of a theft crime, get legal help right away. The Columbia theft attorneys at the Law Offices of Todd K. Mohink, P.A. can help you get the best possible outcome. Fill out the online form or call (410) 774-5987 to schedule a free consultation today. We have two offices to serve you.

Resource:

baltimore.cbslocal.com/2020/05/15/two-men-charged-in-armed-carjacking-at-laurel-exxon-gas-station-anne-arundel-county-shoplifting-incidents/

https://www.marylandlawhelp.com/unemployment-fraud-scheme-in-maryland-uncovers-500-million/

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